Posts tagged ‘Slow Cooker’

Wintertime BBQ Tacos

IMG_8061

Back to school! That means simple, hearty recipes that will keep us going all day long, and tacos are among our favourites. This recipe may look a bit complicated, but don’t be fooled! It’s actually really simple to put together and it makes lots, so you can enjoy it for a few days after the initial work. Each of the elements in these tacos are also delicious on their own. The coleslaw makes an excellent side dish that travels well to picnics and potlucks, and the bbq peppers and tofu are great as a main dish served over rice or couscous. They are extra delicious in these tacos, though, where the tang of the coleslaw stands out against the subtle sweetness of the BBQ sauce, and the yogurt provides a creaminess that makes it all come together.

Wintertime BBQ Tacos
10 small corn or flour tortillas
1 cup plain yogurt
1 cup prepared salsa
1 recipe bbq peppers and tofu (below)
1 recipe cilantro-lime coleslaw (below)

  1. Prepare the BBQ Peppers and Tofu. While they are cooking, prepare the coleslaw.
  2. Fill each tortilla with some of the peppers, tofu, coleslaw, yogurt, and salsa. Fold and enjoy!

BBQ Peppers and Tofu
1 lb. tofu, cubed (about 2 cups)
2 bell peppers, sliced (about 2 cups)
1 large onion, sliced (about 2 cups)
1 cup BBQ sauce

  1. Preheat the oven to 425F. Lightly oil a 9×13 baking dish.
  2. Slice the peppers and onion and cube the tofu.
  3. In the baking dish, toss the veggies and tofu with the BBQ sauce.
  4. Bake for 15 minutes, then stir and bake for an additional 10 minutes.

Cilantro-Lime Coleslaw
4 cups cabbage, thinly sliced (or 1 bag of shredded cabbage)
1½ cups cooked or canned black beans
1½ cups cooked or canned corn
½ cup lime juice (about 2 limes)
¼ cup olive oil
1½ cups cilantro leaves (1 bunch of cilantro)
1 teaspoon honey or agave nectar
¼ teaspoon cumin
salt and pepper to taste

  1. In a blender (or using a hand blender), combine the lime juice, oil, cilantro, honey, cumin, salt, and pepper and blend until smooth.
  2. In a large bowl, toss the cabbage, corn, and beans together with the dressing.

BBQ Peppers and Tofu recipe borrowed from The Vegetarian 5-Ingredient Gourmet by Nava Atlas.

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January 11, 2010 at 10:51 pm 1 comment

Two Vegetarian Chili Recipes: Super Chili

Vegan Chili

So, if you want to fancy things up a bit, here is my “Super Chili” recipe, which is essentially the basic chili with a whole lot added in. I’ve garnished it here with some Avocado Cream, which is delicious and super easy to make, but you can leave it out if you like.

Vegetarian Super Chili
makes 6 – 8 servings

1 large onion, chopped (about 1½ cups)
2-6 cloves garlic, minced (you decide)
1-2 jalapeño peppers, seeded and minced
1 large bell pepper, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 large carrot, chopped (about ½ cup)
½ Tbsp. olive oil
1 – 28oz. can diced tomatoes (or 3½ cups chopped tomatoes and ½ cup water)
2 cups black beans (or 1 – 14oz. can)
2 cups kidney beans (or 1 – 14oz. can)
1 cup chickpeas
1 cup corn
1 large potato, chopped (about 2 cups)
1 cup frozen spinach (or 4 cups raw spinach, cooked down)
2 cups vegetable broth
1 Tbsp. chili powder
1 Tbsp. cumin
1 tsp. maple syrup

  1. In a large soup pot, heat the oil and sauté garlic, onion, jalapeño, bell pepper and carrot until onion is soft. If you are using fresh spinach, add it and cook it down after cooking the onion.
  2. Add tomatoes, beans, corn, spinach, potatoes, broth, spices and syrup and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until desired consistency is reached, about 20 minutes.

VARIATION: Slow Cooked Super Chili: Throw all of the ingredients together into your slow cooker and cook on low for 6 hours.

Avocado Cream
Makes 4 – 8 servings

1 avocado
½ cup plain yogurt
1 tsp. lime juice

  1. In a bowl, mash the avocado.
  2. Add the yogurt and lime juice and mix.
  3. Serve immediately

August 27, 2008 at 9:07 am 2 comments

Two Vegetarian Chili Recipes: Basic Chili

Vegan Super Chili

Requests (ok, one) have come in for recipes that make large quantities and that freeze well. My favourite such recipe is chili and I’m excited to post this recipe because it’s one of the first that I ever came up with on my own. I don’t really like “meaty” chilis and was dismayed that most vegetarian chili recipes replace the meat in chili with fake meat products or TVP. What’s the point when you can throw so many beans in there? If you need your “meat,” though, feel free to throw in a package of veggie ground round or crumbled tofu when you are cooking the onions. This is my basic recipe. It’s great as it is, but feel free to experiment. Tomorrow(ish) I will post my “Super Chili” recipe, which is actually what’s pictured above (shh! don’t tell).

Vegetarian Chili
makes 4 – 6 servings

1 large onion, chopped (about 1½ cups)
2-6 cloves garlic, minced (you decide)
1-2 jalapeño peppers, seeded and minced
½ Tbsp. olive oil
1 – 28oz. can diced tomatoes (or 3½ cups chopped tomatoes and ½ cup water)
2 cups black beans (or 1 – 14oz. can)
2 cups kidney beans (or 1 – 14oz. can)
1 cup corn
1½ cups vegetable broth
1 Tbsp. chili powder
1 Tbsp. cumin

optional garnishes: sliced avocado, hot sauce, yogurt or sour cream, shredded cheese

  1. In a large soup pot, heat the oil and sauté garlic, onion and jalapeño until soft.
  2. Add tomatoes, beans, corn, broth and spices and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until desired consistency is reached, about 20 minutes

VARIATION: Slow Cooker Chili: Throw all of the ingredients together into your slow cooker and cook on low for 6 hours.

August 25, 2008 at 6:47 am 2 comments

Slow Cooked Freezer Beans


I like beans in dips, with rice, in burritos, on salads, in soups and pretty much anywhere else, except in cans. Canned beans annoy me because they often leave me with random amounts of beans sitting in my fridge, going bad before I can think of something to do with them. Not to mention the extra salt from the canning process, or the rinsing, or the wasted packaging.

My solution? Slow-cooked freezer beans. I buy dried beans in bulk and then cook them in my crockpot. My particular appliance cooks hot enough that I don’t have to soak the beans and can cook them in about 2 hours on high. You may need to experiment to see what works best for you. If you don’t have a slow cooker, you can always cook the beans in a pot (see tips below). Once the beans are cooked, I drain them, cool them and freeze them in a large ziplock bag. They occasionally stick together and need to be broken apart. Taking a hammer to them while they are still in the sealed bag seems to work pretty well. The beans will stick together less if they are slightly undercooked. When you want to use them, you can measure out what you need and thaw them by pouring boiling water over them (in a pot or Pyrex bowl), or by boiling them for a minute or two in a pot. (Let’s just get it out now: I don’t use microwaves. I don’t know how they work and they scare me. So you are on your own for microwave instructions).

The advantages of frozen beans are many. First, many gourmands claim that reconstituted dried beans are tastier and healthier than canned beans. Second, you always have beans on hand and can use as few or as many as you need, without having leftovers in your fridge. Finally, it’s cheaper and there is much less wasted packaging as compared to canned beans.

So that’s that. I will leave you now with some handy bean cooking tips:

1. Always rinse your beans before you cook them. This gets rid of some of the sugars that cause flatulence, and can rinse away some of the colour of darker beans so that your slow cooker (or pot) doesn’t get stained.

2. Don’t add salt or acidic foods (like tomatoes) to the cooking water. Add these things after cooking since they can make the beans tough, and keep them from cooking no matter how long you leave them in the pot.

3. Beans expand by two or three times when you cook them, so you need to add at least 3 cups of cooking water for every 1 cup of beans.

4. To cook beans in a pot, soak them for at least 8 hours. Drain them and rinse them. In a large pot, bring water to a boil (at least 3 cups of water for every cup of dried beans) and simmer the beans (the water has to be bubbling the whole time) for 1 – 2 hours, or until cooked. Lentils and split peas do not have to be soaked and only cook for 20 – 30 minutes, but they do not freeze well.

May 27, 2008 at 3:18 pm 2 comments


Feeds

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*All entries tagged "vegan" and "gluten free" meet those dietary requirements to the best of my knowledge as long as the vegan or gluten free instructions are followed (where applicable). It is always wise to double-check ingredients (especially when dealing with packaged foods) and to confirm ingredients and preparation methods at restaurants.